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“Yes we can, yes we did”: President Obama bids farewell to the nation but remains in my soul

Barack Obama has been my president since the fourth grade. I have conquered obstacles with him in office. I have achieved my own goals with him in office. I have lost loved ones with him in office. I have grown up and matured with him in office. I have discovered the true powers of coconut oil with him in office. I have taken risk with him in office. I have become the confident and woke person I am today with him in office. I have become who I am with him in office. President Barack Obama is all that I have ever known.

Although he does not know me, he does. He has shown crucial understanding of not only me, a woman of color, but also countless others across the nation. No matter how hard my days are I have been able to think, hey things aren’t so bad, I have a black president that’s working hard to better my life and the lives of others.

Eight years ago on November 4, 2008, I entered the double red doors of Kolter Elementary School with my head held high wearing thick glasses, 2 afro puffs, a pink Obama for office shirt, and 2 buttons my dad had given me from a celebratory party he attended the night before. You couldn’t tell me nothing.

I didn’t truly comprehend the importance of what was happening but I knew it was something great. The atmosphere felt different.

Over the course of these 8 years I have accomplished things that I would’ve never thought fathomable 8 years ago; just as Barack Obama accomplished a goal that millions thought impossible and spent $100’s of millions dollars to stop. He and Michelle have become my greatest role models and will permanently leave an imprint of love and hope on my heart.

Their endless love for one another and for Americans is a testament to the type of love I wish to know someday. I still stand amazed at their elegance and class when they were called everything but a child of GOD. People would stoop so low as to talk about their children that they raised. However, they preserved and still stand as the most influential people that I know.

The amount of respect that I will forever have for them will continue until I die. Because of them, adolescents and millennials are better people and grew up in the classroom with a positive role model to look upon. I am a better person because Barack Obama was my president. I have so much hope in myself because I was able to experience him lead the country. Their legacy will forever be within me.

They helped so many people and opened the doors of the White House so ALL people can enter regardless of your race, nationality, sex, or creed. They made it okay for Americans to be themselves and be comfortable in the skin that they are in.

It pains me to see them go. It pains me to know the filth that will sit at the oval office next. It pains me to know that the next generation of adolescents will not know or experience the love or hope of the Obama administration. It pains me to know that this will never happen again during my lifetime. It pains me to know that the president-elect is a racist, sexist, homophobic person that does not care about me or other people of color. I feel uneasy inside knowing that the worst action of all, hate is beginning to creep inside the White House.

But, I can’t stop and won’t stop achieving and growing into the person I am meant to become because last night President Barack Obama told me to believe and told me that he was proud of me. Last night, in his last speech ever as President he gave America the blueprint to succeed. He equipped us with the right material and knowledge and now it is our job and our duty to keep moving forward in hope and love.

He acknowledged whites.

“For white Americans, it means acknowledging that the effects of slavery and Jim Crow didn’t suddenly vanish in the ’60s; that when minority groups voice discontent, they’re not just engaging in reverse racism or practicing political correctness; that when they wage peaceful protest, they’re not demanding special treatment, but the equal treatment our Founders promised.”

He acknowledged minorities.

“For blacks and other minorities, it means tying our own struggles for justice to the challenges that a lot of people in this country face- the refugee, the immigrant, the rural poor, the transgender American, and also the middle-aged white man who from the outside may seem like he’s got all the advantages, but who’s seem his world upended by economic, cultural, and technological change.”

Thank you for bringing hope into the nation and transforming hearts and minds towards a more accepting society. Thank you for working hard until the very end and never giving up.┬áMy heart is heavy to see him leave but as he said last night, “We aren’t where we need to be and we have more work to do.”

So let’s get started America. #FarewellObama

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